It’s Not Perfect, But It’s Perfect For Now


 

Abstract:
 

When I had to move out of my rental house, I was torn between wanting to live in my favourite county and moving closer to where most of my friends live. A friend wisely pointed out that whatever my decision, it wouldn’t be set in stone.
 

“It could be perfect for now,” she said. She was right, and in the years since, I’ve found myself applying this wisdom to other areas, too.
 
 

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Deferred dreams

 

People love stories like mine: How I left a soulless job, started working from home and prioritising my passions. What they don’t want to hear about is the years when I still needed that soulless job to pay back dues.
 

Your dreams don’t have a sell-by date. There might be legitimate reasons for deferring them – just don’t make the mistake to postpone joy, too. Life might be perfect for now.
 

Perfect for now

Photo by Kelsey Chance

Find your “perfect for now”

 

Don’t stay unhappy and isolated until you can make the big break. No matter what your situation, there’s always something you can do. Here are a few suggestions to inspire you:
 

  • Pursue your passion in whatever way you can. Reach out to others or join an internet platform if you can’t manage to actually do what you love just yet.
  • Get Coaching, even and especially if you think you don’t have the time, headspace or money at the moment (that’s when it’s most crucial!).
  • Appreciate what’s “perfect for now” about your current situation. Not much time for your passion may mean more time for your kids while they’re young.
  • Set detailed goals for achieving your dream and prioritising your passion. Include steps you can do in your current situation. Keep reviewing and updating your goals.

 

You can always work towards building your life around your passions and purpose. Finding joy today will empower you to stick it out.

Pursuing Your Passion – Or Just A Hobby?


 

Abstract:
 

Passion is an overused word these days. Everything that’s even remotely an interest, is called “passion”. There’s nothing wrong with hobbies or interests, but you need to differentiate between having a hobby and pursuing your passion.
 
 

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What’s the difference?

 

A hobby or interest is anything that captures your attention, anything you enjoy. An example would be my singing: I love it, but it’s not an essential part of my life (music in general is, but not specifically as singing).
 

Dancing is my passion; I can’t be fully myself without it. Passions fulfill a need in you and make you outrageously happy, almost ecstatic. Pursuing a passion makes time fly without you noticing. You feel like you could do this all day. Hobby and passion can feel similar – a hobby can get close to this feeling, especially at first, but it usually doesn’t last.
 

If it’s a passion, you keep rediscovering it and falling in love with it all over again. It captures your imagination for years.
 

hobby and passion

Photo by rawpixel on unsplash.com


 

Why is this important?

 

It’s important because not pursuing your passion means limiting yourself. You don’t fully live up to your potential, and doing that – keeping part of yourself unevolved, under wraps – is one of the most common regrets old people have when their lives are about to end.
 

I spent some time in a reduced version of my life, and the fact I wasn’t dancing almost daily was testament to that. One of the first things I started doing when I “returned to life” was putting on some tunes and dance.
 

Passions also lead to your purpose. It’s not always as straightforward as your passion being your purpose, but once you set your soul alight through radically prioritising your passion, you will stumble on your purpose in some way, shape, or form.

Why Multipassionates Should Cancel Netflix


 

Abstract:
 

I used to have a habit of working on my business and then getting sidetracked by some series or other on Netflix. If it was about something I’m interested in, I justified it by saying I was just pursuing my passion. And then I spent every free minute watching episodes and hardly worked on my business at all.
 
 

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The active/passive nature of passions

 

You see, a lot of passions have an active and a passive side. For examples, if you’re a writer you need to read a lot of books, but you also need to get practice writing – a lot. If you’re a painter, you need to look at others’ art but also produce your own.
 

All of this takes time. The problem especially with multipassionates is that they’re likely to be passionate about at least two or three of these, resulting in a passive-consumption fest like my own Netflix sprees.
 

reading

Photo by Ben White at unsplash.com

The power of focus

 

Yes, you can honour your multiple passions but you also need to focus. It’s just too easy to get sidetracked, and ten times easier for a multipassionate.
 

This process is the remedy:
 

  1. Pick two or three passions at a time, to focus on.
  2. Breathe – it doesn’t mean your other passions are off the table, just temporarily on hold.
  3. Make sure to keep a balance between active and passive work on your passions.
  4. Keep distractions at a minimum (such as your Netflix subscription or Social Media).

You’ll be surprised at how much you can get done! None of this is set in stone, by the way – you can review and revise at any time, which passions to focus on.

Create Your Legacy


 

Abstract:
 

As a multipassionate, I used to have trouble deciding on what to do with my life. I seemed to drift from one thing to the next, never truly settling for anything. I come across this dilemma with many of my clients as well, especially the multipassionates.
 

Stephen Covey recommends to “Begin with the end in mind” when you create your legacy. He suggests to put into writing what you’d like people to say about you at your funeral, in a eulogy. I remember learning a similar exercise in my Coaching studies.
 
 

Join the Tribe of Wild Spirits! You’ll get free weekly Coaching magic, exclusive offers and much more. As a welcome gift, you’ll also get the free Checklist 3 Steps to Stop Procrastinating and Start Doing What Lights You Up TODAY. Simply fill in the form:
 






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Why think about a legacy?

 

Life’s full of distraction. There are books and media, movies and TV programme, hobbies, friends… And of course, work and family are enough to fill every hour of every day in and of themselves.
 

The issue with this is that “busy” doesn’t necessarily imply doing anything meaningful. Often enough, we’re just wasting time with, well, busy work, instead of working on leaving the world a better place. What you should be doing is create your legacy.
 

legacy
 

Finding your “Thing”

 

I recommend you take some time to actually write down your thoughts on this. It might seem a little morbid to you to think of your funeral, so if you like, call it the impact you’d like to make on this world in your life.
 

If you’re still having trouble, find out what people already say about you. Ask five of your closest friends what they think your “thing” is. Ask yourself if you’re happy with their answers, and if you aren’t, it’s time to make changes.
 

Clarity comes first. It acts like a compass in the midst of life’s distractions, and it’ll take you back, time and time again, to what really matters and the legacy you’d like to leave behind.

When Your Passion’s Unprofitable


 

Abstract:
 

In my work, I talk to a lot of people about their passions. When I point out that in my opinion, passions should be front and centre in life, a lot of them answer with a variation of: “That sounds great, but you see, my passion just isn’t profitable.”
 

Experience shows that a passion-centered life always provides for your needs. If this sounds vague, it’s because the actual path looks different for each individual, as my Coaching clients show. Here are some example to get your imagination going!
 
 

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Essentials in life

 

When people think of essentials, they think about paying bills. Ask yourself if you would still need a big house and car if you were outrageously happy and fulfilled?
 

This is not to say material riches are bad. What I’m saying is that people get the order of things wrong. If you focus on the material first, you’ll get stuck on that level; when you focus on passion, the material will follow.
[bctt tweet=”If you focus on the material first, you’ll get stuck on that level; if you focus on passion, the material will follow.”]
An example is a friend of mine who left a well-paying career to follow her passion for travel and became a tour guide for a few years. Now she considers starting her own tour company, which could potentially be very profitable.
 

passion centered
 

Manifold paths

 

It’s not always as straightforward as selling what you create with your passion, or the service you provide. One of my previous clients followed her passion for the history of her country into a career and now leads a cultural heritage centre. Others reduce the “necessities of life” like jobs to a minimum, in order to be able to fully focus on their passion.
 

Some actually do find their passion profitable. This often requires a lot of work on things like self-esteem so you don’t undercharge people just because you love your work. Earning money doing what you love should be the norm, not an exception.